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Culture of Homelessness: Literature of Migrancy and Nomadic Criticism in the 20th and 21st Centuries - Einzelansicht

Grunddaten
Veranstaltungsart Seminar Langtext
Veranstaltungsnummer 094852 Kurztext
Semester SS 2016 SWS
Erwartete Teilnehmer/-innen Studienjahr
Max. Teilnehmer/-innen 25
Credits Belegung Belegpflicht
Hyperlink
Sprache englisch
Belegungsfrist
Einrichtungen :
Englisches Seminar
Fachbereich 09 Philologie
Termine Gruppe: [unbenannt] iCalendar Export für Outlook
  Tag Zeit Rhythmus Dauer Raum Raum-
plan
Lehrperson Status Bemerkung fällt aus am Max. Teilnehmer/-innen
Einzeltermine anzeigen
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Mi. 16:00 bis 18:00 woch Johannisstr. 12-20 - ES 333        
Gruppe [unbenannt]:
 


Zugeordnete Person
Zugeordnete Person Zuständigkeit
Schmitz, Markus, Priv.-Doz. Dr. verantwort
Studiengänge
Abschluss - Studiengang Sem ECTS Bereich Teilgebiet
Master - Kulturpoetik der Literatur und Medien (88 F12 14) -
Bachelor HRSGe - Englisch (LH 049 11) -
Bachelor Grundschulen - Englisch (LG 049 11) -
Bachelor Berufskollegs - Englisch (LF 049 11) -
Zwei-Fach-Bachelor - Anglistik / Amerikanistik (L2 941 11) -
Master - National and Transnational Studies: Literature, Culture, Language (88 992 15) -
Master - National and Transnational Studies: Literature, Culture, Language (88 992 0) -
Master - National and Transnational Studies: Literature, Culture, Language (88 992 7) -
Prüfungen / Module
Prüfungsnummer Modul
11002 Seminar aus dem Bereich Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft - MEd Berufskollegs Englisch Version 2014
11002 Seminar aus dem Bereich Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft - MEd Gymnasien u Gesamt Englisch Version 2014
11002 Seminar aus dem Bereich Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft - MEd HRSGe Englisch Version 2014
14002 Literary/Cultural Studies or Linguistics - Master N a Tn Stud:Lit,Cult,Lang Version 2015
14001 Literary/Cultural Studies or Linguistics (with degree-relevant examination) - Master N a Tn Stud:Lit,Cult,Lang Version 2015
13002 Seminar Forschung - Master Kulturpoetik der Lit.u.M. Version 2014
Zuordnung zu Einrichtungen
Fachbereich 09 Philologie
Inhalt
Kommentar

''It is part of morality not to be at home in one's home''

 Theodor W. Adorno

The 20th century was the age of the refugee, the displaced person, and of mass immigration. To this day vast scale human migration in the wake of neo-imperialism, wars, economic and political revolutions and ethnic cleansing continue to re-shape the global condition. While, for many, these experiences have been and still are experiences of mutilation and loss, they have been transformed by some into a potent motive of modern culture. In Theodor W. Adorno’s ethics of exile just like in the works of numerous 20th century émigré intellectuals before and after him (i.e. Georg Lukács or Edward W. Said) we find a particular exilic mode of thinking and narrating that aims at turning the traumatic experience of dispossession, forced migration, unhappy dislocation or lonely suffering in isolation into a poetic and critical motive. These works demonstrate that the experience of exile and transnational migration contains ample bases for new modes of literary writing and resistant criticism across the learned boundaries of national emplotments and ethnic belonging.

Without overstating a metaphoric understanding of exile that ignores the socio-historical dimensions of the exilic condition, this seminar focuses on migration and exile as key impulses for contemporary cultural production. It starts from the premise that exilic works, by cultivating an oppositional stance toward nationalist or racist identifications, can open the possibility for both, a new politics of literary interpretation and a worldly commitment for transnational solidarity. Selectively exploring literature and criticism written by and about exiles the course aims at demonstrating that although 20th and 21st centuries global migrations were seldom the matter of free choice and can rarely be seen as a privilege, exilic thinking and migratory representations provide important correctives to the dominant mass culture of national(list) belonging. In class we will read literary representations of exile and/or fictional woks triggered by the experience of migration and discuss various theoretical approaches in which the exilic and nomadic functions as a model for literary and cultural criticism. Tracing the predicaments and effects of modern migrations on the individual and the collective level the course approaches exilic, migratory and diasporic imaginaries as equally aesthetic and theoretical subject matters. Drawing on selected literary representations ranging from Joseph Conrad’s novella Amy Foster (1901) to Rabih Alameddine’s novel The Hakawati (2008), it introduces into key concepts and interpretive tools for studying outlandish or nomadic cultural articulations from a decisively transnational and postcolonial perspective. The seminar thus takes up the dominant understanding of home in terms of its very opposite, homelessness to introduce radically decentered models of cultural critique. It is particularly designed to encourage students to develop a critical relationship with their own subject position as readers of Anglophone literatures and cultures in the age of post-colonial migrations. How can we trace a particular poetics of non-arrival in 20th and 21st century writings? Can such poetics serve a respective ethics of not being at home? How (not) to place the texts we are reading into the established taxonomies of national literatures and geographic location? Is it legitimate to speak of the pleasures or even the sublime beauty of exile? Does the literary embracement of such pleasures seriously grasp the being in the world of today’s refugees, their alienated suffering and anonymous border deaths? Can we make use of the nomadic criticism of the past for a critique of current immigration policies? Can a nomadic identity politics help strengthening refugee agency or even to lead exiled people out of exile?   

Literatur

Course participants should acquaint themselves with Joseph Conrad's Amy Foster (no preferred edition) before the first session. In addition they are expected to read Edward Said’s seminal 1984 essay “Reflections on Exile” as an introductory text.

  • Joseph Conrad. Amy Foster (1901)

  • Edward W. Said. “Reflections on Exile” (1984)

Bemerkung

Students are expected to give an oral presentation, to contribute regularly to discussions in class and/or (depending on the program that they are in) to hand in a term-paper (3.500/5.500 words, MLA style).

First class meeting: 20.04.2016

Voraussetzungen

Students are expected to give an oral presentation, to contribute regularly to discussions in class and/or (depending on the program that they are in) to hand in a term-paper (3.500/5.500 words, MLA style).


Strukturbaum
Keine Einordnung ins Vorlesungsverzeichnis vorhanden. Veranstaltung ist aus dem Semester SS 2016 , Aktuelles Semester: WiSe 2022/23